i-TEFL

Teach English Worldwide

Frequently Asked Questions - Visas

FAQs - Visas

Visa sponsorship by schools for any age over 18. Note: Some governments require a university degree in any field for schools to issue you a visa. If you do not have a degree consider the following additional options.

Working Holiday Visa: for those under 30 years of age. Check the country you wish to go to and their arrangements with your home country. This gives you usually one year of working rights. 

Student visa: Enrol in a language school to study a language and receive 20 hours a week of working rights on your student visa. Note: Full time English teaching is around 25 hours (with preparation time on top of this) so 20 hours is almost a full-time wage. (In France you need to register for a University course to get working rights on a student visa but this option will work for most other countries.

Spousal Visa: If you are married to a citizen of the country you wish to travel to, obtain a spousal visa. Note: For the EU this gives you access to working rights in all EU countries. 

European Union: If you have a passport from the EU you have working rights in all EU countries.

Summer Camps: In Europe make use of our job placements where you don't need an EU passport. Work legally on a tourist visa.

Usually your visa must be organised before you arrive in the country. Take care as most countries (not all) will ask you to leave their country while the visa is processed so as to then re-enter. Check the with school if they are sponsoring your visa. 

In South America it seems to be more relaxed and you can arrive on a tourist visa, find work and then they will convert your visa into a working visa. 

Most WHV are for those under 30 or 31 years of age (Canadians up to 35 yr olds) and can only be obtained once in your life. Check your country’s government arrangement with your country of choice.

Worldwide: Most jobs in non-English speaking countries will come with visa sponsorship.

Western Europe (France, Italy, Spain): is more difficult as schools in these countries will employ U.K. / EU citizens who already have working rights. See our summer camp positions if you do not have EU working rights.

Germany: You can apply for a visa once you find a job at a school (enter on a tourist visa). Get a letter from the school, submit application to the Government and wait about one month for processing. 

English speaking countries: Usually you cannot get sponsorship from a school in these countries (Australia, Canada, the U.S., the U.K. South Africa, N.Z. etc) because they will employ those with working rights already. Check out working holiday or student visas as an option. 

Summer Camp: Apply for one i-TEFL's summer camps in Spain, France or Italy and work legally on a tourist visa. Login and visit the job board for details. 

Germany: You can apply for a work visa once you find a job at a school (enter on a tourist visa). Get a letter from the school, submit application to the Government and wait about one month for processing. 

Student visa: Enrol in a language classes at a language school and receive 20 hours a week of working rights on your student visa. Note: Full time English teaching is around 25 hours a week so 20 hours is close to full time (you have preparation time on top of this).

*In France you need to be studying at University (not a language school) to get working rights on your student visa but this option works well for most other countries in the EU as they allow you to be enrolled in a language school and receive working rights on your student visa. 

Eastern Europe: There is a high chance of schools sponsoring you in Eastern European countries. Even in Western European countries you can try to convince a school to sponsor you although you'd need to commit for one year or longer as it is a huge effort for schools to process the visa with their government.